Data Breach Lawsuits

The Importance of Our Equifax Class Action

The Equifax data breach has sent shock waves like we’ve never seen before. Some consumers are only now starting to realize the lasting damage and harm that this breach will have on their lives. Thank you for all of your calls and emails. Please continue to send concerned family, friends, co-workers to us at Equifax@Stritmatter.com. Yes – we have heard from folks from New York, Florida, Virginia, Arizona, California, etc.– a former employee of Equifax, data privacy experts, and reporters who are trying to separate fact from fiction.

I promise to write more soon, as I continue to try to respond personally to as many emails/calls as I can. But please let me address one pesky fiction that occasionally rears its head on corporate-leaning media outlets and individual’s social media posts: A class action against Equifax will address a deep-rooted systemic problem that puts all of us at risk.  I cannot speak for all lawyers. But please think twice before rushing to judgement against those of us who are committed to advancing consumer rights. I will point to our work in the massive Anthem data breach litigation: Significantly, as a result of the Anthem settlement, they have helped all affected from the breach by holding Anthem accountable. The agreement includes a court enforced term that will hold Anthem to a more rigorous standard in its safeguarding of Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Anthem will have to spend at least $90 million annually on beefing up its cybersecurity practices for the coming years. At minimum, my clients will get awarded between $5K -$15K each. Then, there are dozens of attorneys like myself who have invested countless hours and dollars (yes – pursuing class actions costs money) and we will not want to retire anytime soon. BTW: note that federal law has a strict limit on attorneys’ fees.

Thanks to all of you who have contacted us with your stories, questions and concerns. As with our many other clients, we want to help give you a voice and make sure that you recover from this historic data breach.

Light at end of tunnel?

Privacy is a basic right that each consumer should value and want to protect.

For the last several months, I have gone mostly dark on this website. Not purposely. But I’ll admit that the absence of posts here was in large part a reaction to two events–one involving my personal life and the other involving our body politic.

All of us should not give up in the face of the breathtaking insolence of leaders beholden to corporations. I refer not only to Congress’ onslaught against consumer privacy and consumer class actions, but also to the daily (sometimes hourly) blitz on individual rights. Admittedly, it’s difficult to keep track as the battles grow more frequent.

In the end, I urge all of you to tune out the immediate noise. Please know that there are attorneys such as myself who are dedicated to the long-term fight for each consumer’s privacy rights. Always remember that our privacy rights are inextricably entwined with my fight to protect the consumer. Yes, each of us love the convenience that Google, Amazon, Apple, and other major corporations offer us. And, some of these corporations are doing a decent job to protect individual privacy rights. But each of us must remain diligent.

Please stay tuned for the following new blog posts:

  1. Think that a data breach won’t hurt you? Thank again. – I will share with you some eye opening stories of a client, whose personal data was compromised as the result of a massive healthcare data breach. To this day, she continues to deal with identity fraud.
  2. Experian rubs salt in the wounds of 143+ million breach victims  – Don’t accept offers for “free credit monitoring,” from Equifax. In addition to giving up your valuable Personal Information, you will also give you your right to sue Equifax. If you think that arbitration sounds fair enough, you are in for a rude awakening.

 

Post Spokeo: Two recent cases split on the nature of data breach injuries

In Joan Longenecker-Wells v. Benecard Services, Inc., plaintiffs were employees who learned that their personal information, including date of birth, social security number, addresses, etc. which resulted in fraudulently filed tax returns. The Third Circuit dismissed the Plaintiff’s claims, stating that their negligence claims were barred by the economic loss doctrine. The Third Circuit explains:

The District Court held that because Plaintiffs’ negligence claim sounds only in economic loss resulting from the fraudulent tax returns filed with their information, the economic loss doctrine bars their claim. We agree.

Food for thought. Can we say that a plaintiff, who experiences this grave injustice of losing the benefit of a 5 figure tax return is only sustaining economic loss? The real harm and the risk of ongoing identity fraud is more than economically and emotionally harmful. We must focus on the deeper rooted issue that lies at the heart of data intrusion cases. The fundamental right to privacy that has deep roots in our history now extends to our digital privacy.

In contrast, we have Taylor v. Spherion Staffing LLC, et al. No. 3:15-cv-2299 (N.D. Ohio 2015), Ernst v. Dish Network, LLC, et al. No. 1:12-cv-8794 (S.D.N.Y May 27, 2016); Hillson et al. v. Kelly Services, No. 2:15-cv-10803 (E.D. Mich. June 8, 2016). These cases settled and involved allegations of statutory violations. Keep in mind that Spokeo left open the possibility that a statutory violation may involve a real risk of harm to satisfy the concreteness requirement. Thus, settlement may have presented a more attractive alternative than extended litigation about the sufficiency of alleged harms.

Walmart, Home Depot and banks are suing for data breach class action lawsuits

Walmart, Home Depot and Wendy's are some of the companies filing lawsuits for data breaches.

Consumer class action lawsuits are not a company’s worst nightmare, when they experience a massive data breach. Nope. It’s the lawsuits that Walmart, Home Depot and Wendy’s are filing for data breaches that can result in more massive losses for the breached company.

Headlines about the latest data breach continue to surface on the news about as frequently as we hear about Trump’s campaign travails. Interestingly, when Walmart,Home Depot or Wendy’s sues Visa and MasterCard for their data breach issues, those lawsuits don’t make the front pages. Did you know that banks got together and filed a class action lawsuit against Target for the much publicized data breach? The consumer class action lawsuits against the health insurance behemoths like Anthem and Premera have garnered a lot of attention. In the meanwhile, some of the Goliaths are suing the other Goliaths for their class action was certified late last year.

A takeaway from all of these class action is that the victims and plaintiffs in data breach lawsuits  are not only everyday  consumers, they are also retail giants, banks, employees, etc. When an organization fails to exercise due care in safeguarding personal information, it had better get ready to face the wrath of someone…

What’s up with the careless attitude towards inadequate data security?

An increasingly common and relatively easy way for hackers to access sensitive data is through “phishing,” where unwitting recipients of email or texts (SMS phishing or “smishing”) trust the sender with the sought after information. According to Verizon’s new 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report, about 90% of security incidents stem from some form of phishing.  Verizon reports that phishing continues to trend upward and is found in the most opportunistic attacks as well as “sophisticated nation-state tomfoolery.” But president of the Olympia School District chuckles (yes, that’s right, chuckles) at its recent breach resulting from phishing because, according to what he told MyNorthwest reporter, Sara Lerner:

“It happens…it’s an opportunity to have that conversation and move forward with it. You could call it a teachable moment if you want to,” he said, with a chuckle. 

That kind of cavalier attitude is exactly the problem that we have with so many school districts and government agencies. One cannot be careless, when it comes to sensitive data, whether it is at a school district or at the Health Care Authority/Apple Health Data Breach, where an employee’s mishandling and HCA’s insufficient privacy protocols allowed the medical records of 91,000 individuals to get sent to an unauthorized recipient 

As we continue our class action litigation regarding the Anthem data breach as well as the Amerigroup Washington data breach, I learn more about how stolen protected health information (PHI) is marketed on the dark net. To those who want to toss caution to the wind, feel free to do so with your own data. Just not everyone else’s.

BTW: If you were one of those who received a data breach notification from HCA or the Olympia School District, please contact me at Catherine@Stritmatter.com or 206.448.1777. I would like to learn your perspective and story, as well as share the details of how we’re trying to hold these organizations accountable to prevent future data breaches.

Medical records data breaches rose over 40% in 2014

In 2014 43% of all stolen data was medical records. Credit: The Economist

In 2014 43% of all stolen data was medical records. Credit: The Economist

I wanted to share the above infographic from The Economist. which illustrates the spike in data breaches since 2005. Most notable: Medical records data breaches rose over 40% last year. Subcontractor and Employee negligence are also on the rise. A couple of positive takeaways is that there is apparently less insider theft and a decreasing percentage of breaches that include social security numbers.

 

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