Google

Why care about Data Privacy for your family? #PrivacyAware

Jan. 28, 2016 is Data Privacy Day. Let's do what we can to defend our children's privacy.

Jan. 28, 2016 is Data Privacy Day. Let’s do what we can to defend our children’s privacy. #PrivacyAware

Tomorrow, January 28, 2016, is Data Privacy Day.  Big deal? It actually is: The first Data Privacy Day that occurred in the United States and Canada was in 2008, which was observed as an extension of the Data Protection Day celebration in Europe. Data Protection Day commemorates the Jan. 28, 1981 signing of Convention 108, which was the first legally binding international treaty dealing with privacy and data protection.

Now led by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), Data Privacy Day has become the signature event promoting privacy awareness. Without committed defenders of privacy, like the Electronics Frontier Foundation, we would not have seen a complaint filed with the FTC against Google for unauthorized collection of school aged children’s information, when they are using Google Apps and Chromebooks in their schools. Google’s unauthorized collection of personal information from school children via Chromebooks and Google Apps for Education (GAFE)—caught the attention of Senator Al Franken, a ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law. Franken responded by writing a letter to Google CEO Sundar Pichai asking for information about GAFE’s privacy practices.

The first step to ensure that our student privacy campaign succeeds, is to educate ourselves as parents. This way, we can direct our energy and knowledge effectively. On this Data Privacy Day, take the time to check out the resources that the Electronic Frontier Foundation compiled to regain control of your children’s privacy. Please spread the word about student privacy by sharing these and similar resources with other parents!

I can’t emphasize enough how important it is that parents understand their and their children’s rights. We live in a world where parents may be asked by schools to waive those rights before their youngsters are permitted to use technology in the classroom. Third parties will too often encourage parents to give schools consent to release their children’s information to those very third parties.

Interested in becoming part of the “privacy defender team?” There are many ways in which you can get involved.

 

Breaking the vow of non-Googleness

Imagine life without Google. It's pretty darn close to impossible.

Imagine life without Google. It’s pretty darn close to impossible.

Can you imagine a world without Google? I can’t.

I have a Droid phone as well as an iPhone. But everything tethers to my Google world — contacts, maps, videos, etc.

It wasn’t always this way, but internet marketers (including Google) have figured out that the key to making money off of content is via online profiling and highly targeted advertising. If you Google something or shop on Amazon, do you notice how your latest online shopping follows you to online news sites, your gmail, yahoo mail, etc? That’s how sophisticated online marketing has grown. (As I mentioned elsewhere, I too used to work in the online marketing/high tech world. We would hear concerns about privacy, but needed to tune them out to figure out how to get the most bang for our clients’ marketing/advertising dollars.)

Finnish security researcher and chief research officer Mikko Hypponen tried to vow a life of unGoogleness. After all, he understood his privacy was threatened every time he broke his vow. But, try as he might, he couldn’t.

Hypponen spoke at a WSJ technology conference, WSJDLive, openly confessed that the Internet has evolved into a privacy nightmare because of the users’ reliance on “free” services. (I will talk more about “free” and sex in an upcoming blog post.)

“I really tried getting rid of Google,” he said. “You can’t avoid Google. We are way beyond that.” True that.

Let me know if you’ve succeeded in upholding the vow of nonGoogleness. I’d love to know how you did it!

Subscribe to Blog via Email