Online Marketing

Understanding the value of Privacy is NOT “Privacy Paranoia”

We should care about Privacy because it is a fundamental aspect of living a free, autonomous existence.

We should care about Privacy because it is a fundamental aspect of living a free, autonomous existence.

Why do people not care about Privacy? Some will offhandedly claim, “I have nothing to hide.” Others will say that big data and government surveillance should not concern those who are law abiding and innocent of wrongdoing. But the problem with this response is that it reveals a lack of understanding regarding the value of privacy. Privacy is not a mere shield or wall to hide certain details about us from others. The concept is not reducible to single acts of intrusion or violation of one’s personal sphere. To think about Privacy in terms of someone peering into your window to watch you with your family is to focus on only one tiny strand of tapestry or one grain of sand in a beach.

Think of the value of Privacy this way: If you drank one glass of lead-laden water from Flint, would you see a quick path to cancer or any other potentially deadly disease? Probably not. But the problem for those in Flint was that they drank water contaminated with lead for years. The cumulative effect, the acts taken in the aggregate were what caused so many in Flint to suffer irreversible health problems.

This is the same way the Privacy violations harm each of us and our society as a whole. The information collection, aggregation, insecurity, increased accessibility and decisional inferences/interference (“decisional interference” was coined by Prof. Daniel Solove).

While nebulous, Privacy is important because it affords individuals a basic amount of autonomy and control over facts and details that make each unique. In the aggregate, “big data” seems harmless. But as we have seen, there are many ways to hack and identify personally identifiable information (PII). When the PII and/or valuable data sets of individuals get in the wrong hands, one loses control over their finances and their digital existence. One of my data breach clients suffered and continues to see fraudsters obtain lines of credit, obtain a Washington State driver’s license, and so on. Folks: This is NOT Privacy Paranoia. It is a well informed fact that we need to care about how our PII is disclosed and safeguarded.

Most people do not realize how their data is getting sold in myriad forms either legally or illegally. I will talk about this more in future posts. That private data has value in virtually every imaginable industry. If it matters to others, it certainly should matter to you. At the very least, to value your Privacy is to value control over the information that is accessible about you. If you don’t care about having that minimal amount of control, then feel free to broadcast your SSN along with all of your family’s SSNs and dates of birth.

Why care about Data Privacy for your family? #PrivacyAware

Jan. 28, 2016 is Data Privacy Day. Let's do what we can to defend our children's privacy.

Jan. 28, 2016 is Data Privacy Day. Let’s do what we can to defend our children’s privacy. #PrivacyAware

Tomorrow, January 28, 2016, is Data Privacy Day.  Big deal? It actually is: The first Data Privacy Day that occurred in the United States and Canada was in 2008, which was observed as an extension of the Data Protection Day celebration in Europe. Data Protection Day commemorates the Jan. 28, 1981 signing of Convention 108, which was the first legally binding international treaty dealing with privacy and data protection.

Now led by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), Data Privacy Day has become the signature event promoting privacy awareness. Without committed defenders of privacy, like the Electronics Frontier Foundation, we would not have seen a complaint filed with the FTC against Google for unauthorized collection of school aged children’s information, when they are using Google Apps and Chromebooks in their schools. Google’s unauthorized collection of personal information from school children via Chromebooks and Google Apps for Education (GAFE)—caught the attention of Senator Al Franken, a ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law. Franken responded by writing a letter to Google CEO Sundar Pichai asking for information about GAFE’s privacy practices.

The first step to ensure that our student privacy campaign succeeds, is to educate ourselves as parents. This way, we can direct our energy and knowledge effectively. On this Data Privacy Day, take the time to check out the resources that the Electronic Frontier Foundation compiled to regain control of your children’s privacy. Please spread the word about student privacy by sharing these and similar resources with other parents!

I can’t emphasize enough how important it is that parents understand their and their children’s rights. We live in a world where parents may be asked by schools to waive those rights before their youngsters are permitted to use technology in the classroom. Third parties will too often encourage parents to give schools consent to release their children’s information to those very third parties.

Interested in becoming part of the “privacy defender team?” There are many ways in which you can get involved.

 

Breaking the vow of non-Googleness

Imagine life without Google. It's pretty darn close to impossible.

Imagine life without Google. It’s pretty darn close to impossible.

Can you imagine a world without Google? I can’t.

I have a Droid phone as well as an iPhone. But everything tethers to my Google world — contacts, maps, videos, etc.

It wasn’t always this way, but internet marketers (including Google) have figured out that the key to making money off of content is via online profiling and highly targeted advertising. If you Google something or shop on Amazon, do you notice how your latest online shopping follows you to online news sites, your gmail, yahoo mail, etc? That’s how sophisticated online marketing has grown. (As I mentioned elsewhere, I too used to work in the online marketing/high tech world. We would hear concerns about privacy, but needed to tune them out to figure out how to get the most bang for our clients’ marketing/advertising dollars.)

Finnish security researcher and chief research officer Mikko Hypponen tried to vow a life of unGoogleness. After all, he understood his privacy was threatened every time he broke his vow. But, try as he might, he couldn’t.

Hypponen spoke at a WSJ technology conference, WSJDLive, openly confessed that the Internet has evolved into a privacy nightmare because of the users’ reliance on “free” services. (I will talk more about “free” and sex in an upcoming blog post.)

“I really tried getting rid of Google,” he said. “You can’t avoid Google. We are way beyond that.” True that.

Let me know if you’ve succeeded in upholding the vow of nonGoogleness. I’d love to know how you did it!

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